Tip 1: Assuming Positive Intent

This discussion will happen LIVE at our TRM Facebook Group on Friday, January 19 from 7:00p-9:00p EST  and again on Thursday, January 25 from 11:30a-1:30p!  Hope to “see” you there!   Introduction: Assuming positive intent can be tricky, especially when operating in a space that is perceived as “hostile” or “unsafe”.  Often, we approach these situations with suspicion. When there is a lack of trust, or when we do not assume positive intent, we may have feelings of being threatened or criticized both on a personal and professional level. Why do we lose our way at times? *We do want to have accurate beliefs.  We do not want to be wrong. *We tend towards confirmatory bias.  We seek people and resources that agree with what we believe.  The end result is being less skilled in dealing with our reactions to people or resources that counter our beliefs.   *We are trying to do something big which means the stakes are high for us. We may feel that people are trampling on our beliefs.   *We feel like we are intellectually under siege.  Conversations can move quickly and our words may be misinterpreted.   So, how do we work towards a lense of “positive intent”? First, it means that we need to be willing to pause and view the situation/information from a different lense. Second, it means we have to take a “leap of faith” and believe that there is no hidden agenda and that the person behind the content or situation is there to try to help or learn. To further support and extend the concepts for assuming positive intent in...

Dr. Michella Maiorana-Basas Hosts a Discussion on Content Area Reading

   (This discussion aired live on our Facebook Group on January 11 and January 16, 2018) Introduction: Content reading skills include a specific subset of skills (beyond the “Big 5”) that are required for reading content texts (e.g., textbooks, articles, non-fiction books, etc.). What makes content area reading different from narrative reading is that much of the time, the reader is “reading to learn” something. In the classroom (both in regular education and in deaf education) teachers are not incorporating specific instruction to support students in the development of the skills necessary for reading complex texts and make assumptions that if a student can read a narrative text, they can also read an expository text. Content reading skills are classified as advanced literacy skills which are critically important for success in school and post high school. What are examples of content texts? Text books (mathematics, science, social studies, etc.), non-fiction/expository texts, articles, and magazines (weekly reader, national geographic, etc.) are the most common examples of content texts.  Content texts can include manuals, biographies, and other historical and scientific texts. What are the skills of content reading?: Themes from the research suggest that these skills (along with the basic skills of reading and critical inquiry) are integral in successfully navigating content texts: Activating and Building Background Knowledge; Content-Specific Vocabulary; Understanding and Using Text Features; Understanding Text Structure; and Inference. Why should teachers and parents focus on content reading skills?  The current research indicates that 5% of DHH high school seniors have the same literacy outcomes as their hearing counterparts (Kelly & Barac-Cikoja, 2007) and many plateau at a 4th grade reading level (Easterbrooks &...